If you’re considering paving your driveway, parking lot, or other surfaces, asphalt is an excellent choice and comes with many benefits. Asphalt paving has a lot to offer both residential and commercial properties, but the key to any successful asphalt project is the asphalt contractor undertaking the work. A great asphalt contractor can create a long-lasting product that is durable, aesthetically pleasing, and built to stand the test of time; however, a lesser quality asphalt contractor has the potential to cause damage to the surrounding site or create a product that is weak and poorly installed. 

It’s worthwhile, therefore, to make sure you select the best asphalt contractor for your project. If your pavement needs sealing, a crack repair, or a completely new surface, here are 10 questions to ask before hiring an asphalt contractor. 

1. How long has your company been in business?

Understanding how much experience a company has can help you set relative expectations of their final products. If a company has less experience, it does not necessarily indicate that your project will be a failure, but asphalt contractors with extensive experience are likely to have gained a lot of knowledge that will be applied to your project, and it shows that they have had years and years of happy customers allowing them to grow their business. At Asphalt Doctors, we have over 30 years of experience serving Colorado. 

2. Where in Colorado do you serve? 

It’s important to ensure that prospective asphalt contractors serve the communities in which your project is located, otherwise, it could end up being a waste of time and money deliberating with them. Therefore, always ask about a contractor's service area before getting too deep into the process with them. For your reference, Asphalt Doctors serves Denver and the Front Range from Fort Collins to Colorado Springs. Give us a call if you want to know whether we can serve in your area. 

3. What asphalt services do you provide? 

There’s a lot that goes into asphalt paving, and your project may require one or several different services to achieve the desired result. Be sure to ask prospective asphalt contractors about what asphalt services they provide to understand the depth and breadth of products they can offer your project. Asphalt Doctors provides full-service asphalt products including asphalt overlay, crack sealing, seal coating, asphalt patching (surface, infrared, and full-depth), pothole repair, asphalt maintenance, asphalt paving, and more. 

4. How long will my project take? 

It’s important to gauge how long your project will take. For many, minimizing downtime for usable space is critical. Unfortunately, project timelines significantly depend on the type of work being performed. Once Asphalt Doctors has been awarded a project, we schedule the job and provide you with the scheduled date. If your project requires the asphalt portion to be done at a certain time, please indicate this to our estimators and we will do everything we possibly can to accommodate your schedule. Typically the late spring and early fall are our busiest times of the year, and providing an immediate turnaround is not always feasible, since we have other projects already on our schedule. However, small projects like infrared patching can be performed in as little as an hour. 

5. Can you work in the winter? 

If your project requires a specific type of asphalt service and it is currently the winter season, it’s wise to check whether it can be performed. Typically, sealcoat and overlays require the ground temperature to be above 45° F. Otherwise the asphalt or sealcoat does not cure properly and flaking can occur. At Asphalt Doctors, we can perform asphalt patching and crack filling all throughout the year. 

6. What additional fees are not included in my bid? 

When you get a bid from an asphalt contractor, be sure to evaluate what exactly is included in the quote and what isn’t. Some contractors may omit certain fees that will arise later in the process, so don’t hesitate to ask about the particulars. We typically do not include testing, permit fees, traffic control, surveys, utility adjustments, or bonds in our project bids. If these are required, please make sure to note this on your request for a bid.

7. Are you fully licensed and insured? 

It’s also important to know whether asphalt contractors are fully licensed and insured before undertaking work for your project. If they are not, this could result in a serious liability issue should a worker get injured on the job. Asphalt Doctors is a fully licensed and insured asphalt contractor! 

8. Do you have references or reviews from past customers?

Hearing from past clients and customers of a prospective asphalt contractor can give great insight into what to expect from their services. Check out Asphalt Doctors’ testimonials page to see why our clients love working with us. 

9. Will you clean up after the project is completed? 

Completing an asphalt project successfully with a beautiful end-product is one thing, but no one wants to be left with a busy clean-up job after the fact. Make sure you ask potential asphalt contractors about whether they will clean up after the project is completed - the team at Asphalt Doctors never leaves the site until any and all debris resulting from the process is removed and your satisfaction is assured. 

10. What materials do you use? 

Always inquire about the materials that an asphalt contractor intends to use for your project. Substandard asphalt mix, for example, will result in a lower price but will also mean that your surface is not durable and potentially unsafe. Materials will generally vary depending on the type of project and the service being provided, but Asphalt Doctors always meets or exceeds Colorado State Highway Specifications for our materials, and we will provide you with manufacturer certification upon request. 

Direct Your Questions to Asphalt Doctors

At Asphalt Doctors, our team understands the scale and significant investment in an asphalt paving project. Naturally, this will come with certain questions, and we always strive to provide our clients with all the information they need so that they can keep peace of mind that their project is in the most capable hands. If you're planning an upcoming asphalt project or have more questions that we didn’t cover in this article, reach out to the expert asphalt contractor at Asphalt Doctors today!

Are you planning a new driveway, walkway, or road and wondering what the best material would be to get the job done? The most common materials for these projects are certainly asphalt and concrete, but it begs the question of which is the cheaper of the two. Unfortunately, there isn’t as straightforward an answer as you might hope—for what do we mean by cheap? Lower quality or lower price? And is this answer contingent on its application? 

At Asphalt Doctors, we are experienced professionals in asphalt and concrete services. Read on for our balanced analysis of whether asphalt is cheaper than concrete. 

What is asphalt? 

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Asphalt is a mixture of binder, aggregates, and filler mainly used for constructing and maintaining roads. It is a black, viscous petroleum product - in essence, a sticky black residue that remains after processing crude oil and mixed with a combination of stone, sand, and gravel. While it may seem like a ‘newer’ road surface, it has actually been around for more than a hundred years and is, proportionally, more often used for the construction of major roadways than concrete. It is poured onto roadways in a molten form before it is cured and shaped into place.

According to the National Asphalt Paving Association, the United States has approximately 3,500 asphalt plants that produce a total of about 400 million tons of asphalt pavement—a material worth over $30 billion.

What is concrete? 

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Concrete is much more similar to asphalt than many people initially believe - it is a composite material composed of aggregate (sand, stone, and gravel - much like asphalt) bonded together with a fluid cement. Surprisingly, concrete is the second-most-used substance in the world after water, mostly in the application of the built environment. When the rock, gravel, and sand aggregate is mixed with water and concrete, the fluid form of concrete is poured onto a roadway and shaped and compacted accordingly. 

This material has been used for thousands of years, with some evidence of concrete floors dating back to 1400 B.C. 

Which is the ‘cheaper’ material? 

There are two ways in which we can define ‘cheap’, so in order to answer the question of whether asphalt is cheaper than concrete, let us first analyze if it is a lower quality, cheaper material. 

Asphalt can be characterized as an overall softer surface material than concrete. This in itself is a double-edged sword. Because it’s softer, asphalt surfaces can accommodate minor settlement and deformation. It will become even softer in hot temperatures, and it can be susceptible to cracks and potholes, especially with frequent freezing and thawing cycles. Asphalt is a less durable material with a lifespan of around 20 years, but it is also relatively easy and inexpensive to maintain.

Concrete’s strong, sturdy, and solid nature makes it a durable option for all types of applications, including construction and roadways. Concrete can better withstand heavy loads and can last up to 50 years. Also, it is susceptible to damage from freezing and thawing cycles just like asphalt, and the resulting damage can sometimes be more extensive because the material itself is less flexible. Therefore, it must be built correctly and precisely to allow it to expand and contract appropriately. While this material is more durable and stronger against heavy weight and frequent use, it can be more difficult and more costly to maintain. 

In terms of quality of material, asphalt is higher quality (less cheap) in the short term, but it is lower quality (cheaper) in the long term. For particular applications, however, some individuals see concrete as a more aesthetically pleasing option, such as for sidewalks and park pathways, and in other applications, such as residential roadways, asphalt is seen as the more aesthetically pleasing option. 

Which material costs less? 

The cost of each material is much more straightforward to answer. 

Asphalt is a generally more affordable option compared to concrete. This is true for initial installations, regardless of the size of the project, but also for maintenance costs. Asphalt is very easy and cost-effective to repair using methods such as surface patching, infrared patching, full-depth patching, and seal coating. 

Concrete, on the other hand, is a more expensive material. It costs more for the initial installation, but it is also expensive to repair as well. The problem with concrete is that when it is damaged, it is not easily repaired like asphalt is. Cracks can be sealed, but if the damage is more extensive, entire sections of the concrete that are damaged must be replaced completely with new concrete. 

In conclusion, asphalt is a cheaper or less expensive material. 

Asphalt and Concrete Experts 

As you can see, the answer to whether asphalt is cheaper than concrete is not exactly straightforward. If by cheap we are discussing quality, it depends largely on the application of the material, though asphalt is indeed less durable and has lower longevity than concrete. This is counterbalanced by asphalt’s flexibility and ease of maintenance. For price, asphalt is by far the cheaper material. Being both affordable to install and maintain, asphalt is a fantastic choice combining quality and price. 

Asphalt Doctors are experts in both asphalt and concrete installations. If you’re ready to start your own roadway project or if you have more questions before getting started, don’t hesitate to contact our team of friendly professionals today! 

Every year homeowners invest their precious time and money to improve their home, but did you know that your driveway has a substantial impact on its total value? For homes that are on the market, driveways are one of the primary exterior features analyzed during an inspection - this is because a well-maintained driveway can significantly enhance a property’s aesthetic appeal and longevity, whereas the opposite can greatly detract from it. 

By investing in proactive maintenance such as sealcoating, you can extend the lifespan of your driving surfaces by protecting them from harsh Colorado elements like snow, hail, rain, intense sunlight, and frequent periods of freezing and thawing. At the Asphalt Doctors, we have experience working with all types of commercial and residential driveways - what follows is our comprehensive guide detailing the importance of regularly sealing an asphalt driveway. 

What is Sealcoating? 

Sealcoating is one of the most effective ways to maintain an asphalt driveway, making it look brand new aesthetically and impervious to damage from weather and wear. It involves applying a viscous liquid very similar to asphalt on top of the original asphalt surface, which can be applied in a targeted manner over cracks and chips or across the entire surface. Sealcoating is essentially a protective barrier that shields the original asphalt surface against anything that might wear it down or cause it damage. 

Composed of either coal tar pitch or asphalt cement mixed with inert fillers, water, emulsifying agents, and additives, the result is a smooth, black finish that resembles what asphalt looks like when it is new and freshly laid. At Asphalt Doctors, we utilize a specially designed coal tar emulsion sealer that meets all federal government specifications.  

Why Does Asphalt Deteriorate? 

There are many reasons why asphalt can fail including poor initial installation, low-quality materials, water ingress (mixed with periods of freezing and thawing), extensive use, overloaded weight, intense UV rays, and more. The most common factor that damages asphalt, however, is surface water that seeps into the asphalt and causes it to expand and contract when it freezes and thaws. Mixed with poor drainage and compounding damage from potholes, asphalt can deteriorate quickly once the damage has begun. 

The Importance of Sealing an Asphalt Driveway 

As mentioned above, once asphalt has received some damage such as the development of a crack or a small pothole, further damage can spread quickly in exponential fashion. What starts as a simple, almost invisible crack leads to a larger crack, which then leads to a pothole that eventually grows into an entirely broken section of the driveway. 

When your driveway is not properly maintained, therefore, you can expect to see more damage and more costly repairs quickly add up over the course of its life until it needs a premature replacement. The only way to prevent these expensive repairs and replacements is to invest in regular sealcoating of the asphalt driveway. 

The benefits of regularly sealing an asphalt driveway include: 

How Often Should You Seal Your Driveway? 

You should consider sealing your driveway as needed as well as on a routine basis. If you notice that your driveway is becoming gray and dried out or is forming small cracks and chips, this is definitely a sign that your driveway needs to be sealed before it starts developing even more significant damage. 

On the other hand, you should also consider sealing your driveway routinely. Depending on how much the driveway is used and whether it tends to hold a lot of weight or get access to a lot of moisture and sunlight, the frequency your driveway needs to be sealed will vary. As a rule of thumb, we recommend resealing your driveway at least once every two years, and more frequently if you have the means to do so. Despite the added cost, the benefits of routinely sealing your asphalt driveway are worth it, because, in the long run, significant repairs and replacements will end up costing you far more than a routine sealing. 

How to Seal Your Driveway 

While it is possible to sealcoat your driveway yourself, it is always recommended to hire the help of professional sealcoating services unless you have all the equipment you need and a lot of experience using it. Renting or purchasing seal coating equipment in itself often makes a DIY job more expensive than simply hiring a professional, and if you don’t have experience sealcoating, it’s likely that the end result will be uneven and ineffective at protecting the asphalt driveway. 

Conditions must be right to have sealcoating done. The temperature must be at least 45 degrees for no less than 24 hours during and after the application and it cannot be applied if rain is expected in the next 24 hours. No vehicles are allowed on the surface during the application process and must remain off of the surface for 24 hours after the application. Be sure to turn off all the sprinklers as well so the surface doesn’t get wet. 

The pavement will be swept and blown clean before being cured and treated with a primer. Two applications of the sealcoat will be applied, and all edging/ small spaces will be hand-applied with a squeegee. The first coat is applied with 30 mesh sand to create a thicker coat, and the second coat is sprayed on by a mechanical applicator to obtain an optimum sealcoat. 

Schedule Regular Sealing with the Asphalt Doctors 

Sealcoating is one of the most important elements of a pavement management plan, and it is highly recommended that asphalt driveways are regularly sealed in order to maintain their structural integrity and prevent significant and costly repairs or replacements over time. With summer around the corner, there’s no better time to start protecting your driveway from the harsh Colorado elements - contact the Asphalt Doctors today to learn more or to get started with your sealcoat project! 

Potholes can be a significant safety risk. Whether in a private area such as a neighborhood or driveway or in public spaces such as parking lots and highways, they must be repaired as soon as possible. The most common method of fixing potholes is asphalt patching, due to its efficiency and cost-effectiveness. 

It’s not worth leaving a pothole to grow and cause more damage! From the experts at Asphalt Doctors, here’s all you need to do about how asphalt potholes are patched. 

What is a pothole? 

Any asphalt surface, including parking lots, driveways, roads, highways, and footpaths, can develop potholes. A pothole is a depression in the surface of asphalt where the tar has worn away, most often through extensive use, heavy weight, or weather erosion. Potholes can cause damage to the tires on bikes and vehicles along with a car’s alignment, suspension, and framework. 

Potholes can cause a car to swerve or veer slightly, leading to hundreds of road accidents every year. Furthermore, the potholes can grow and size and cause other structural issues if left unattended. It is, therefore, crucial that swift and effective repairs are made.

How do potholes form? 

Potholes can form when cracks develop on an asphalt surface. Heating during the day and cooling at night (along with similar seasonal temperature patterns) can cause the asphalt to expand and contract which causes the cracks to form. Water from rain, snow, and frost enters these cracks and, when the temperature drops below freezing, will cause the cracks to expand, creating more damage. As stress is added with continual traffic and the weight of moving vehicles, these cracks can grow further, developing into larger holes - also known as potholes. 

Methods of Pothole Repair 

There are several different methods used to repair potholes, including skin, infrared, and full-depth patching. 

Surface “Skin” Patching

Skin patching is a quick method for repairing minor defects in asphalt surfaces, such as low areas, depressions, minor rutting, delamination, and slight deterioration. This method replenishes the top layer of asphalt. 

Infrared Patching

Infrared patching is used for critical repairs such as high-traffic area potholes, pavement heaving, uneven surfaces surrounding catch basins, and rough surfaces. This method allows for deep penetration asphalt repair in a short period of time. 

Full Depth Patching “R&R”

Full-depth patching is a patching method for major displacement, faulting, alligatoring, potholes, and other asphalt defects that require the asphalt to be patched at its full depth. This method completely removes and replaces damaged asphalt.  

How Potholes in Asphalt Are Patched 

How potholes are patched will vary slightly depending on the solution chosen, but they all follow a general set of steps. 

Step 1 - Check the Condition of the Foundation

Some asphalt surfaces, such as footpaths, may be different, but most asphalt surfaces are laid on top of a foundation of compacted gravel that sits above the soil layer. An evaluation of the condition of the foundation will ensue before beginning any repair work. 

Step 2 - Cut Edges and Square the Perimeter of Damage 

All damaged asphalt will need to be removed including the surrounding space which likely has cracks - any cracks that remain could cause the pothole to reform and become worse. Using an asphalt saw and hammer, a professional team will remove all damaged asphalt, specifically in the shape of a square or rectangle which will last longer than other shapes. 

If performing a surface patch for spaces with minimal damage, no asphalt will be removed - a new layer will simply be applied over the surface. If performing an infrared patch, the existing damaged material will be heated and reused on the spot with a mixture of new asphalt material. 

Step 4 - Clean the Area and Remove Damaged Material (Full-depth only)

Once all damaged material has been removed and the area has been squared off accordingly, the area will be cleaned including all dust, debris, and plant life. Roots need to be carefully removed in order to prevent plants from growing through cracks or the patch. 

Step 5 - Repair Foundation (Full-depth only)

Now that the area is properly excavated and cleaned, the foundation must be repaired if there is any damage. Top up the foundation with a mixture of gravel and sand, then tamper and compress it accordingly to create a flat surface. Be sure to use a level to check that the foundation is properly repaired. 

Step 6 - Repair Surface

Surface patching will begin by applying CSS-1H tack coat to the repair surface, followed by a hot asphalt plant mix which is feathered and compacted appropriately. The work is finished by being neatly squared off. 

Infrared patching utilizes an infrared heating unit to heat the damaged surface over 6-12 minutes after it has been treated with a reclamite rejuvenating agent. A new hot asphalt plant mix is added to the existing asphalt, and the repair area is raked, tamped, and treated. Finally, the finished product is compacted at least twice in accordance with industry standards and squared off. 

Full-depth patching will apply CSS-1H tack coat to exposed vertical surfaces once all damaged asphalt material has been removed. Several layers of new asphalt plant mix are added to the repair area and compacted thoroughly with each application. The job is finished by squaring off the repair area. 

Step 8 - Haul Away and Recycle Old Material

After the asphalt surface is repaired, all the old, unused material is hauled away from the repair site in order to be recycled. 

Step 9 - Clean Up and Surface Preparation

All debris resulting from the process will be cleaned and the surface will be fully prepared for future use. 

Put Your Trust in the Asphalt Doctors

The family-owned team at Asphalt Doctors knows just how important it is that our asphalt surfaces are repaired as efficiently and effectively as possible - that’s why we only use the best practices and materials, and why we hold ourselves to the highest professional standards. We care deeply about our customers, employees, suppliers, and contractors. Contact our team today to schedule your asphalt patch and to learn why our clients love working with us.

Asphalt is one of the most frequently used materials for driveway surfaces due to its durability, cost-effectiveness, and versatility. However, whether it's through heavy use, extreme weather, or even just a long life, asphalt driveways may incur some damage from time to time and require repair. 

If you’ve been doing some research, you’ll probably know that there are many different ways to repair an asphalt driveway. Some are better than others, and even our recommended method, asphalt patching, comes in a variety of different forms. From the team of experts here at Asphalt Doctors, here is the best way to patch an asphalt driveway. 

What is asphalt patching? 

Asphalt patching is a broad term referring to the repair of cracks and holes within an asphalt’s surface. Regardless if it is recent or older damage, small or extensive, asphalt patching is the most cost-effective way to repair and protect your pavement. In its most general form, asphalt patching includes the mixing of used and new asphalt that is relaid and paved on top of old asphalt. Damaged sections of the asphalt driveway may be excavated, reheated and mixed with new asphalt, then relaid and tamped down to form a surface that appears and functions like new. 

Types of Asphalt Patching

There are several different types of asphalt patching. The first delineation is hot and cold asphalt patching. Cold patching or cold asphalt repairs are fast and don’t require special heavy rolling machines or applicators. Asphalt is simply shoveled or poured into the pothole, crack, or damaged section and tamped down. Cold patching is certainly a temporary fix, but it is much quicker and easier to achieve. This is a great option if you’re looking for a DIY solution for a private road or driveway, but it does not last very long and another repair will likely be due in the not-too-distant future. 

Hot asphalt lasts much longer, is much more durable, and provides a more solid base. However, it does require specialist equipment and trained contractors, which makes it a slightly more expensive option. Hot asphalt is the best way to patch an asphalt driveway to ensure longevity and structural integrity, but the type of hot asphalt patching depends on your driveway’s particular situation. Hot asphalt has several different forms that are used in a variety of applications, such as: 

Surface “Skin” Patching: this hot asphalt patching method is used for minor defects such as low areas/depressions, minor rutting, delamination or slight deterioration of asphalt. As such, this method is not used for potholes or major breaks. 

Infrared Patching: this asphalt patching incorporates a blend of hot-mix asphalt with the original, damaged asphalt. Potholes, cracks, and rough surfaces are excavated, compacted, and reapplied for a seamless restoration. This is a very popular patching method as the infrared rays allow deep penetration asphalt repair and reclaiming without causing burning, scaling, or separation of the asphalt from the aggregate. Infrared patching has additional advantages including cost savings, as the project is completed with fewer raw materials; time savings, as this repair option takes less time than traditional asphalt resurfacing; seamless repairs, as the patch bonds to the existing surface and produces no joints for water to penetrate; and fewer traffic interruptions, as the patch can be driven on almost immediately.

Full Depth Patching “R&R”: Full depth patching is another hot asphalt patching method, used primarily for major damage that requires the full depth of the asphalt to be repaired or replaced. Damage such as displacement /faulting, alligatoring, and major potholes need this type of repair.

Patching versus New Asphalt 

There are certain situations when a new asphalt driveway may be recommended over patching. A general rule of thumb is that asphalt driveways will have a lifetime of 15-20 years. If your driveway is at this age or beyond, we recommend a new driveway as the amount of repairs it will need will only increase and a new driveway will be much more cost-efficient. Similarly, if your driveway has cracks and potholes covering one-third or more of the driveway, a replacement will be more cost-efficient than trying to repair it all. 

If, however, your driveway is still generally young and the damage is not too extensive, patching will always be recommended because it will be less expensive and much quicker to complete. 

Professional Asphalt Patching versus DIY Repair 

Many people might wonder whether the best way to patch an asphalt driveway is to hire the help of a professional contractor or to get it done as a DIY project. The answer to this ultimately depends on your goals. If you want the quickest and least expensive asphalt patch, then a DIY repair will be the way to go. Unfortunately, DIY projects are only able to use cold asphalt mix as hot mix requires extensive experience and heavy machinery that is hard to use and expensive to rent. 

If your goal is to patch your asphalt driveway with a solution that will be durable, long-lasting, and structurally sound, then hot asphalt patching with the help of a professional is the wiser choice. If time is your biggest concern, hot mix takes slightly longer to apply than cold mix, but in most situations, a driving surface can still be ready within a few hours! 

The Bottom Line: The Best Asphalt Patch with Asphalt Doctors

The best type of asphalt patching largely depends on the particular situation of your asphalt driveway, such as the extent and type of damage. Working with experts such as the Asphalt Doctors will not only be able to provide all the most effective types of asphalt patching, but our experienced team will help you determine the optimal patching method that your driveway needs. 
If you’re ready to get started with your asphalt patching project or if you still have a few more questions, don’t hesitate to contact the friendly professionals at Asphalt Doctors today!

Recycled asphalt, or reclaimed asphalt, is among the most common surfacing materials for roads, parking lots, footpaths, and playgrounds. But what exactly is recycled asphalt, why is it important, and how does it work? 

Read on to learn all about recycled asphalt from our team of experts.

What is Asphalt? 

Asphalt is a man-made material primarily composed of a binding substance (bitumen) and aggregates. Bitumen is a black, viscous by-product of oil, and aggregates are a mixture of crushed rock, sand, and gravel. Combined, asphalt is a durable and cost-efficient material for surfacing outdoor spaces. 

What are the Benefits of Asphalt?

There are many benefits of asphalt. 

Is Asphalt Recyclable? 

Asphalt is recyclable using advanced commercial equipment. While an existing asphalt surface can be crushed and recycled offsite, new techniques allow asphalt to be recycled and relayed onto the roadway or surface structure without being transported elsewhere. This can include additional recycled asphalt millings to supplement surface repair or as a sub-base material directly beneath the surface. 

Why is it Important to Recycle Asphalt? 

Recycled asphalt is an economically efficient and environmentally friendly way to repair surfaces, including road shoulders, potholes, utility cuts, etc. Asphalt is chemically composed of residue from the distillation of petroleum (resins and oils) along with compounds of hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, and oxygen – being able to recycle these chemical components has a significant impact by reducing the environmental footprint of acquiring more production material. 

How is Asphalt Recycled? 

Asphalt is recycled through hot and cold methods, either offsite at a central processing facility or in-place recycling. 

Hot Mix Asphalt (Central Processing Facility)

Recycled hot mix is often produced at a processing facility. The process produces a finished granular asphalt product processed to the desired gradation. This product is subsequently incorporated into hot-mix asphalt paving mixtures as an aggregate substitute. 

Hot Mix Asphalt (In-Place Recycling)

Hot in-place recycling is a process of repaving that is performed as either a single or multiple-pass operation using specialized heating, scarifying, rejuvenating, lay down, and compaction equipment. There is no processing required before the actual recycling operation. One of the most common techniques is called ‘infrared patching.’

Cold Mix Asphalt (Central Processing Facility)

The asphalt processing requirements for cold mix recycling are similar to those for recycled hot mix, except the asphalt product is incorporated into cold mix asphalt paving mixtures as an aggregate substitute.

Cold Mix Asphalt (In-Place Recycling)

The cold in-place recycling process involves specialized plants or processing trains, whereby the existing pavement surface is milled to a depth of up to 6 inches, processed, mixed with asphalt emulsion (or foamed asphalt), and placed and compacted in a single pass. There is no processing required before the actual recycling operation.

What is Recycled Asphalt Used For? 

Recycled asphalt is used to construct, repave, patch and repair driving surfaces along with walk and bike paths, parks, outdoor basketball courts, schoolyards, and more. Recycled asphalt saves money on time and materials instead of investing in an entirely new surface, extending the lifetime, safety, and good appearance of an existing asphalt surface. 

Can Anyone Recycle Asphalt?

Recycling asphalt is a process that requires both experience and commercial equipment, such as crushers, infrared heating machinery, screening units, conveyors, and stackers. In addition to these hurdles, asphalt contains potentially hazardous materials that are dangerous if not handled with the proper care, expert techniques, or safety equipment. It is recommended that recycling asphalt is left to professionals. 

Start Your Recycled Asphalt Project 

Recycled asphalt is the best method for repaving an existing surface because it is less expensive, faster, and more environmentally friendly than newly created asphalt admixtures alone. 
Asphalt recycling may seem complex at first, but you don’t have to face it by yourself. If you manage an asphalt surface that needs repaving, don’t hesitate to contact the experts in recycled asphalt today!

Colorado’s extreme weather (and corresponding temperature fluctuations) unfortunately strongly impacts the structural integrity of our roads. With over four million miles of roadway across the United States, every foot, including your own asphalt driveway, is at risk. 

Investing in seal coating is one of the most effective ways to ensure the longevity of your asphalt driveway. By applying a new layer above the existing asphalt, professional seal coating has preserved the safety of our roads and untold thousands of driveways. It gained popularity across the U.S. for its strength and ease of use, but how does it work, and how often should it be used? Read on to hear what our experts have to say. 

Colorado Asphalt Driveways at Risk

Asphalt is especially susceptible to the elements. 

Colorado, therefore, makes survival for asphalt roads particularly challenging. Depending on where you live across this beautiful state, temperatures can have more than 150°F worth of variance between its officially recorded hottest and coldest temperatures. And you only really need to live in Colorado for a year to experience all four seasons in a single week. 

Our state makes asphalt longevity difficult enough; seal coating is our best choice to maintain them. 

Why Seal an Asphalt Driveway?

The benefits of seal coating asphalt driveways include the following: 

How to Seal an Asphalt Driveway 

It is usually recommended for a professional to undertake the seal coating service. It deals with harsh chemicals and fumes, requiring experience and skill to do it right. If you’re still determined to make it a DIY job, here are a few general guidelines before getting started: 

Step 1

Clean the driveway of dirt, dust, and debris. Clean stains, oil, and grease, and remove all weeds along the driveway's border. The pressure washer works well for initial cleaning. 

Step 2 

Patch cracks and holes well before treating a driveway with seal coating. 

Step 3

Mix sealant buckets one at a time and clean the surface again. 

Step 4

Begin sealing the driveway from top to bottom by pouring sealant and brushing it into place with a squeegee. Use a paintbrush along the edges to ensure precision. The squeegee should be held at a 45-degree angle to push the sealant accordingly so that, with its self-leveling properties, a flat surface is made. 

Step 5

Wait 24 hours, then apply a second coat. After the second coat, allow another 24 hours before walking on it and 72 hours before driving. 

How Often Should I Seal My Asphalt Driveway? 

Sealer should be applied to a brand-new asphalt driveway three to six months after installation. Sealing coat your driveway every three to five years is generally recommended, depending on a few variables. 

Seal coating might be needed more frequently on Colorado driveways due to the harsh Colorado climate, weather, and sunshine. Furthermore, should a driveway appear faded or damaged in isolated areas, it may indicate that another seal coat is required. Pay attention to the signs, but you can expect to seal asphalt driveways at least every few years. Consistent treatment is key to longevity and aesthetic quality. 

If the driveway is over 20 years old, the foundation is unstable, or cracks run deeper than 2 inches, seal coating might not be as effective because it will combat an underlying weakness. 

Are There Downsides to Sealing an Asphalt Driveway?

Seal coating is popular for a reason, but its use has some limitations. Seal coating should be considered a protective layer, not a magical solution to a damaged road. Seal coating will not, in fact, repair or restore asphalt in any way; it will simply protect it from further damage while making it appear renewed in color and texture. If the structural integrity of a road is compromised, it must be repaired before seal coating can be used. 

Asphalt Doctors to Your Asphalt’s Aid

Asphalt seal coating is a widespread solution to preserve the vitality of our roads and driveways. By applying a new layer of protection, your driveway is safe against the harsh Colorado climate and continues to look like the day it was installed. 
Are you seeking protection for your asphalt driveway? Asphalt Doctors is Colorado’s top choice for seal coating and all things asphalt. Contact our team of experts with any questions or to get started with seal coating today!

Preparing an outdoor surface that can stand up to the harsh Colorado elements can be a challenging undertaking, but technology has offered us a number of innovative solutions to overcome this. Asphalt seal coating is one of the most common methods for protecting driveways, walkways, and parking lots, and it’s likely only going to continue growing in popularity. 

But what is asphalt seal coating, and how does it benefit you? Here’s a deep dive into everything you need to know from the experts at Asphalt Doctors. 

What is Asphalt Seal Coating?

Asphalt seal coating is an inexpensive process that helps to extend the lifespan of underlying hard surface material such as concrete or asphalt. This liquid coating is rolled or painted over the area, and once allowed to cure, it effectively seals (hence the name) the material from potential exterior damage. It comes in two forms: Coal Tar Emulsion and Asphalt Emulsion. 

Seal coating is the most common solution to small damage, such as cracks or holes caused by freezing temperatures and frequent traffic. It also helps protect the underlying surface from excessive oxidation, prevents damage from spreading to other areas in the underlying structure, and defends against air, water, oil, gas, salt, chemicals, and ultraviolet rays. 

It is a thoroughly effective and highly efficient method that offers protection and resiliency to surfaces to remain in good condition, even in extreme weather conditions. 

What is Seal Coating Made Of? 

As previously discussed, asphalt seal coating comes in two primary forms: Coal Tar and Asphalt Emulsion.

Coal Tar seal coating comprises a thick black liquid, a byproduct of bituminous coal. It is made of thousands of chemicals and is different molecularly than asphalt. Coal Tar seal coating is then created by mixing the bituminous coal byproduct with inert fillers, water, and emulsifying agents. 

Asphalt Emulsion seal coating is made of asphalt, water, and a small amount of emulsifying agents. 

Coal Tar is the industry's most commonly used asphalt seal coating. 

What is the Process of Asphalt Seal Coating?

Every asphalt company has a different asphalt seal coating process, but at Asphalt Doctors, our process includes the following: 

  1. Protection. We install cones and barricades to protect nearby human and animal life and traffic passing by. 
  2. Clean and Edging. Our team edges the perimeter of the asphalt being treated and trims down any plant life that has grown between cracks. We then conduct deep cleaning of the area with an industrial blower and power sweep. 
  3. Oil Stains. Oil stains and spots are treated with a primer to encourage effective adhesion of the chosen sealer. 
  4. Seal Coat. Apply a first coat, then let dry before applying a thicker coat. 
  5. Repaint Lines. If work is being conducted in a parking lot, parking spot lines will be repainted upon the drying of the second layer. 
  6. Clean and Edges (part 2). Our team cleans the edges of the work site. 
  7. Customer Evaluation. Once all work is complete, we conduct a walk-through with our customers to ensure that our finished product meets all standards of quality and expectations. 
  8. Open Site. Cones and barricades are removed and opened for public access. 

Seal coating is completed during the spring, summer, and autumn - temperatures of at least 50 degrees Fahrenheit are required. 

Asphalt Seal Coating vs. Asphalt Pavement 

Various other methods exist for installing asphalt or conducting an asphalt surface repair. One of the most common, alongside seal coating, is asphalt paving. This is a holistic renewal and new installation of asphalt, and it can be applied directly to materials such as concrete, gravel, or even existing asphalt. 

Other methods for conducting an asphalt repair include: 

Colorado Asphalt Seal Coating 

Asphalt seal coating effectively and efficiently protects outdoor surfaces such as roads, walkways, and parking lots. This extremely quick process creates resistance to all types of liquids, chemicals, and even UV radiation so that your surfaces have longer lifetimes, even after incurring damage. 

If you’re considering asphalt seal coating or any other type of asphalt solution for your project, be sure to contact the experts at Asphalt Doctors - we are committed to quality, ethics, service, and efficiency. Give our team a call today! 

Recycled asphalt, or reclaimed asphalt, is among the most common surfacing materials for roads, parking lots, footpaths, and playgrounds. But what exactly is recycled asphalt, why is it important, and how does it work? 

Read on to learn all about recycled asphalt from our team of experts.

What is Asphalt? 

Asphalt is a man-made material primarily composed of a binding substance (bitumen) and aggregates. Bitumen is a black, viscous by-product of oil, and aggregates are a mixture of crushed rock, sand, and gravel. Combined, asphalt is a durable and cost-efficient material for surfacing outdoor spaces. 

What are the Benefits of Asphalt?

There are many benefits of asphalt. 

Is Asphalt Recyclable? 

Asphalt is recyclable using advanced commercial equipment. While an existing asphalt surface can be crushed and recycled offsite, new techniques allow asphalt to be recycled and relayed onto the roadway or surface structure without being transported elsewhere. This can include additional recycled asphalt millings to supplement surface repair or as a sub-base material directly beneath the surface. 

Why is it Important to Recycle Asphalt? 

Recycled asphalt is an economically efficient and environmentally friendly way to repair surfaces, including road shoulders, potholes, utility cuts, etc. Asphalt is chemically composed of residue from the distillation of petroleum (resins and oils) along with compounds of hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, and oxygen - being able to recycle these chemical components has a significant impact by reducing the environmental footprint of acquiring more production material. 

How is Asphalt Recycled? 

Asphalt is recycled through hot and cold methods, either offsite at a central processing facility or in-place recycling. 

Hot Mix Asphalt (Central Processing Facility)

Recycled hot mix is often produced at a processing facility. The process produces a finished granular asphalt product processed to the desired gradation. This product is subsequently incorporated into hot-mix asphalt paving mixtures as an aggregate substitute. 

Hot Mix Asphalt (In-Place Recycling)

Hot in-place recycling is a process of repaving that is performed as either a single or multiple-pass operation using specialized heating, scarifying, rejuvenating, lay down, and compaction equipment. There is no processing required before the actual recycling operation. One of the most common techniques is called ‘infrared patching.’

Cold Mix Asphalt (Central Processing Facility)

The asphalt processing requirements for cold mix recycling are similar to those for recycled hot mix, except the asphalt product is incorporated into cold mix asphalt paving mixtures as an aggregate substitute.

Cold Mix Asphalt (In-Place Recycling)

The cold in-place recycling process involves specialized plants or processing trains, whereby the existing pavement surface is milled to a depth of up to 6 inches, processed, mixed with asphalt emulsion (or foamed asphalt), and placed and compacted in a single pass. There is no processing required before the actual recycling operation.

What is Recycled Asphalt Used For? 

Recycled asphalt is used to construct, repave, patch and repair driving surfaces along with walk and bike paths, parks, outdoor basketball courts, schoolyards, and more. Recycled asphalt saves money on time and materials instead of investing in an entirely new surface, extending the lifetime, safety, and good appearance of an existing asphalt surface. 

Can Anyone Recycle Asphalt?

Recycling asphalt is a process that requires both experience and commercial equipment, such as crushers, infrared heating machinery, screening units, conveyors, and stackers. In addition to these hurdles, asphalt contains potentially hazardous materials that are dangerous if not handled with the proper care, expert techniques, or safety equipment. It is recommended that recycling asphalt is left to professionals. 

Start Your Recycled Asphalt Project 

Recycled asphalt is the best method for repaving an existing surface because it is less expensive, faster, and more environmentally friendly than newly created asphalt admixtures alone. 
Asphalt recycling may seem complex at first, but you don’t have to face it by yourself. If you manage an asphalt surface that needs repaving, don’t hesitate to contact the experts in recycled asphalt today!

Driving surfaces, whether parking lots or roads, are often made of one of two types of material: concrete or asphalt. Concrete and asphalt have their respective advantages, but is one material better to use than the other? Read on for our neutral comparison, and gain deeper insight to help decision-making on your own project. 

Need professional help for your road, parking lot, or driveway project? Contact the experts at the Asphalt Doctors right away. 

Concrete vs Asphalt

Concrete is made from a mixture of sand, cement, and gravel. This mixture is then poured and left to cure for approximately one week, creating a strong, durable, and long-lasting concrete surface. It is often gray in color. 

Asphalt, on the other hand, is made from a mixture of sand, stone, and petroleum products to create a durable adhesive that is rolled out and cooled. It is often black in color. 

Choosing Concrete 

Pros of Concrete

Cons of Concrete

Choosing Asphalt

Pros of Asphalt

Cons of Asphalt 

Head to Head: Which is Best? 

Overall, many factors contribute to whether concrete or asphalt is the best option for parking lots and roads. Ultimately, it comes down to your project’s particular situation and needs, but for most situations, our team of experts recommends asphalt parking lots and roads. 

If you have a project that needs a short-term solution, asphalt is great because it has a lower average cost ($2-4 per square foot vs. concrete’s $4-6 per square foot). Repairs are also easy, quick, and inexpensive compared to the alternative. 

Additionally, in climates like Colorado, it’s smart to choose a product that can withstand the frequent fluctuations in temperature. Concrete can easily erode and crack with constant freezing, thawing, and the application of antifreeze chemicals. Asphalt, on the other hand, does well against highly variable temperatures and can, again, be easily repaired in case of damage. 

Some projects, like major highways, must withstand up to 40+ years of wear and tear, making concrete a more economically viable solution. Similarly, if a project requires as little greenhouse gas emissions as possible, concrete could be the right choice for you. 

Contact the Experts

If you are considering a new road, parking lot, or driveway, it’s important to work with the experts in Colorado. Contact the professionals at the Asphalt Doctors today to get started!

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